Podcast

Case Study of a Commercial Real Estate Bridge Loan

This podcast outlines a recent loan we originated, secured by a strip shopping center located in Ohio. This loan was compelling based on the income of the property. The attractive income outweighed the negative factor of the property being far from our office.

"Gotcha" Issues with Income Property

This podcast presents a list of "gotchas"--things that can make what appears to be a good investment actually turn out to be a bad investment, because the income stream ends up being less than what it appears to be. The podcast also presents a critical and at the same time enjoyable step in the process of researching an investment, namely, visiting the property and driving around the property in concentric circles to get a feel for the neighborhood.

Underwriting Income Property

This podcast introduces some of the issues involved when underwriting income property such as apartments or shopping centers, when considering making or investing in a loan secured by income property. The key is to understand the value of the property and value is driven by ability to generate cash flow, which in turn is driven by a variety of factors, depending on the property type.

How to Value Income Property

This podcast addresses the issue of how to value income property, in the context of making a loan secured by an income property such as a shopping center or apartment building. The concept of the capitalization rate is introduced.

A Quick Primer on Income Property

This podcast explains briefly how to look at income property investing, and specifically, how to think about the value of apartments, shopping centers and industrial buildings. Coming up with a good estimate of the property's projected cash flow is the the key to understanding the risk of investing in a trust deed secured by that property.

Case Study: A Junior Loan on a Fix-and-Flip Project

Those investors comfortable taking more risk may want to consider making a junior real estate loan, which can provide more equity-like returns (both on the upside and the downside) as opposed to the steadier returns on lower-risk first trust deeds. This podcast outlines a specific project in which we made a junior loan. This investment has now paid off and it was successful.

Things That Can Go Wrong when Investing in Trust Deeds

This podcast addresses problems that can come up when investing in real estate loans. The most common problem is a default, but other problems include natural hazards, fire and bankruptcy by the borrower, to name a few. All of these issues can be mitigated with property structuring, however many investors are afraid of having to deal with these types of issues, which helps explain why investors in real estate loans get paid well for the amount of risk they take.

Assessing the Risk: Is a particular SFR Trust Deed Safe?

This podcast explains the pricing and terms private lenders can expect when lending to established, high volume single family residential rehabilitation specialists. It also explains the loan-to-cost and loan-to-value underwriting criteria that are typical in our market as of mid-2011. The current market is profitable for both lender and borrower, and provides an appealing opportunity for real estate investors looking for high current yields with a solid margin of safety.

Should I invest in trust deeds?

This podcast outlines selective positives and negatives of investing in trust deeds. The main focus is to highlight the limitations of trust deed investing so that investors go into this type of investing with realistic expectations‚ and steer clear if this type of investment does not match their objectives. Please watch our blog as we will be posting one new podcast roughly every week. There will be about 30 podcasts total in the series, and this is the sixth. If you are interested in learning more about what we do, give us a call at 310-905-3050.

Trust Deed Investment Paths and Outcomes

This podcast gets to the heart of what outcomes the trust deed investor must be prepared for. There are two main outcomes: (1) get paid back, on time, with interest; and (2) borrower fails to perform, in which case there is a default and lender pursues a foreclosure to protect lender's interests. Within this second outcome, there are two sub-paths: (2a) foreclosure auction takes place, and the lender is outbid by another investor, in which case the lender gets paid back, with interest and reimbursement of attorney's fees; or (2b) lender is the highest bidder at the foreclosure sale in which case lender owns the property after the foreclosure sale. Lender can then hire a broker to sell the property. If the loan wasn't excessively large relative to the value of the property, lender should ultimately get his or her money back, with an attractive return, to compensate for the hassle and work involved in foreclosing and having to hire a broker and sell the property.

Please watch our blog as we will be posting one new podcast roughly every week. There will be about 30 podcasts total in this series. If you are interested in learning more about what we do, give us a call at 310-905-3050.

WSJ: A Bull Market in Rental Housing

To access the article Jan discusses below, please click here: A Bull Market in Rental Housing - WSJ This article from the Wall Street Journal makes the case that buying apartments should yield attractive returns today. It is true that prices are down from their peak and the outlook for future increases in rental income is positive. However, the article sidesteps the single largest challenge for apartment investors--the market is overheated. In Los Angeles, there are hundreds of wealthy individuals and families searching for small properties to buy for all cash. They have pushed down capitalization rates, defined as initial cash flow from operations divided by purchase price, to the 5% to 6% range. Even though interest rates are low, the initial cash-on-cash return for apartment investors in California, defined as cash flow after debt service divided by the buyer's down payment, is in the low single digits.

For a very long term investor who has lots of extra cash to invest, buying apartments does indeed represent a valid investment investment strategy. However, for professional investors and others with limited resources to invest, buying apartments in Southern California at full retail value should be considered with skepticism. At the moment we prefer to make short-term loans to opportunistic investors who are buying assets from banks. By taking a strategy that is far off the main beaten path, and focusing on loans that are too small for real estate private equity funds, we cut the competition by 80 to 90% vs. the competition to buy apartment deals. With less competition comes better risk-adjusted returns, in our view. This is not to say that we won't buy any apartments...only that there needs to be a very unusual situation in order to entice us to spend time chasing an apartment acquisition, given today's high prices relative to cash flow.

Why do borrowers need private lenders like Arixa Capital?

This podcast addresses the question "Why do borrowers need private lenders like Arixa Capital?" The answer is that banks will only make loans that fit into their current, restrictive criteria. Many of the loans we make are good quality loans but they don't fit banks' current lending criteria. Please watch our blog as we will be posting one new podcast roughly every week. There will be about 30 podcasts total in this series. If you are interested in learning more about what we do, please sign up for our newsletter or give us a call at 310-846-1754.

Maturity of Residential & Commercial Bridge Loans

This podcast addresses the maturity of both commercial and residential bridge loans. The maturity is the length of time that the loan can be outstanding before it must be repaid. The range of maturities is 6 months to three years, depending on product type.

Investors need to be very mindful of maturity because the lender generally cannot accelerate the repayment of a loan. If the lender needs liquidity prior to a loan being repaid, the only option is to sell the loan which might require some discounting as an inducement to other investors. Of course there is no guarantee that a loan will be repaid on its maturity date.

The investor needs to be prepared to foreclose on any loan if necessary, and subsequently sell the underlying property to recoup principal and interest, which generally would add six to 12 months to the investment time horizon on top of the maturity of the loan.

Purchasing Loans Secured by a Trust Deed

This podcast addresses the secondary market for short-term, small balance real estate loans. Some companies originate loans and then sell the loans to investors seeking yield. These companies can then re-lend their funds to generate origination fees. This is a niche market with only a small number of players in each region. Please watch our blog as we will be posting one new podcast roughly every week. There will be about 30 podcasts total in this series. If you are interested in learning more about what we do, please sign up for our newsletter at www.stndcap.com or give us a call at 310-846-1754.

Our first podcast of a series on "Trust Deed Investing" is here!

As part of our commitment to providing high quality education in the field of real estate investment, Arixa Capital is launching a series of podcasts on the subject of investing in trust deeds (real estate loans). The first podcast in the series is shown below to hear the podcast, just click on the image. This first podcast explains the main differences between investing in real estate loans vs. purchasing and operating real estate itself. In today's environment, Standard Capital is very active as a lender to opportunistic buyers of real estate, because investing in loans provides current income while maintaining an appealing margin of safety.

Please watch our blog as we will be posting one new podcast roughly every week. There will be approximately 30 podcasts in this series. If you are interested in learning more about what we do, or to learn about other educational opportunities brought to you by Standard Capital, please sign up for our newsletter at www.stndcap.com or give us a call at (310) 846-1754.

Thanks for your interest in Standard Capital,

Jan Brzeski

February 2nd Panel Discussion Video

For those of you who were unable to attend our February 2nd panel discussion, or would simply like to listen to the discussion again, the UCLA Ziman Center was kind enough to record the event this year. Download the file here to view on your computer's media player: The New Normal Panel Discussion, February 2nd, 2011

or watch the video online at http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/x25943.xml

If you have suggestions for making the event even better next year, or would like to reach us for any other reason, we would love to hear from you. Please email Kari Burns at kburns@stndcap.com.

Podcast: Jan Brzeski addresses 10 FAQs on trust deed investing

Jan Brzeski has created a podcast to address 10 frequently asked questions about trust deedinvesting.

- What is trust deed investing? - What are the benefits and disadvantages? - How does trust deed investing differ from other real estate investing options? - What is Arixa Capital doing in the area of trust deed investing?

Click here to download.

We hope you find our white paper informative. Please feel free to contact us with any questions or comments, or to get more information about Arixa's Capital's services.